This companion is designed to provide more clarity about creating an application for MAP’s 2018 grant cycle.

We recommend that you keep this page open while completing your Round One application in Submittable. 


  1. Project title
  2. The project was initiated by:
  3. Who wrote the project description?
  4. Project description (750 words)
  5. When will the first produced version of the project take place for a public?
  6. Who do you think might best understand this project? You may select more than one.
  7. Optional: Please name any specific techniques or aesthetics the artistic team may bring to the project.
  8. Please fill out and upload the Artistic Team spreadsheet available HERE.
  9. Artist statement format options
  10. Work samples

1. Project title

This is what staff and reviewers will use to reference your project. You may enter a working title here. It may change at any time.

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2. The project was initiated by:

  • The artistic team
  • One or more curators
  • One or more institutions

Your answer to this question will open a short series of fields to help reviewers understand more about how this project will be made (or produced), and what the relationships are between the artist(s), the applicant organization (which is the nonprofit entity that will receive and distribute the grant in the event of an award), and any other organizations that may support the project.

We understand that your response may be a “projection” (what you think might happen) or reality (what is already happening). Do your best to align your choice with what you know at the time of submitting your proposal. We know this structure will change and evolve over time.

Ex. The artistic team – Artists dream up a project idea. They reach out to curators, venues, and/or other partners to pitch the idea they have and seek support to create the work. They may or may not need a fiscal sponsor.

Ex. One or more curators – An independent curator dreams up a project idea, and begins to consider which artists they would like to hire or commission to fulfill the idea. They contract an artist, and then determine whether or not they want to work with other partners to help the artist produce the project.  

Ex. One or more institutions – An orchestra wants to commission a composer to create a new work on a theme of the orchestra’s choosing. They hire the composer and plan to produce / present the project in-house.

Depending on the selection, you will be prompted to provide information about the applicant organization:

  • Name of the nonprofit that is applying on behalf of the project
  • Nonprofit’s website
  • Nonprofit representative’s name (if different than the primary contact for this application)
    • Independent artists who are submitting the application should list the name of their fiscal sponsor contact.
    • If you are a representative of a nonprofit, but are not a designated signatory for the organization, please provide the name of someone who is authorized to sign contracts.
  • Nonprofit representative’s email (if different than the primary contact for this application)
    •  Independent artists who are submitting the application should list the email of their fiscal sponsor contact.
    • If you are a representative of a nonprofit, but are not a designated signatory for the organization, please provide the email of someone who is authorized to sign contracts.

If relevant, you will also be prompted to provide information regarding institutional support:

  • Name of one of the institutions that will produce the project
  • Select all services that the institution intends to provide the project:
    • administrative support
    • commissioning funds
    • other in-kind resources
    • project presentation contract
    • residency and development opportunities
    • none of the above
  • Briefly describe how the institution plans to support the project (50 words)

Artists and organizations may apply for more than one project. However, the final panel may choose to distribute resources as widely as possible, meaning that they may choose to only support one of the artist’s or organization’s projects.

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3. Who wrote the project description?

This helps reviewers understand whose voice is present in the text.

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4. Project description (750 words)

To the extent possible, the description should make clear the “who, what, when, where, why, how” of the project. The description can also point to any known artistic practices, ethics, community engagement strategies, and future visions for the project.

It may be written in first or third person, and is most effective coming from the artists’ points of view.

*For those artists and organizations that may not know “what the project is” until later in the process, consider these options:

  • Skip this year. Apply to a future grant cycle when more details are known to you. Generally, applicants who can point with specificity to the project’s vision (even if all details or collaborators are not known), are the most successful at MAP.
  • If you choose to apply, use the description to speak to any of the following: 
    • offer the questions you are asking yourself at this time 
    • some information about your practice(s)
    • why you are endeavoring on this course of artistic research at this time
    • some information about ideal environments for the project 
    • audience engagement intentions as relevant
    • insight into what you hope to learn or discover as the project unfolds

Please visit the project description page for more details.

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5. When will the first produced version of the project take place for a public?

  • July 1, 2018 – Dec. 31, 2018
  • Jan. 1, 2019 – Dec. 31, 2019
  • Jan. 1, 2020 – June 30, 2020
  • July 1, 2020 or beyond

MAP welcomes applications from artists who are working in linear, cyclical, and other modes. Artists whose work is process-oriented, iterative, and/or reject the idea of completion should select “July 1, 2020 or beyond.”

For artists who do anticipate a time of completion or a “premiere,” please select the date range that you anticipate. You do not need a firm commitment from a venue to make your selection.

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6. Who do you think might best understand this project? You may select more than one.

  • Dance/performance specialists
  • Music/performance specialists
  • Theater/performance specialists

Your selection helps MAP staff assign your application to the most appropriate reviewers.

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7. Optional: Please name any specific techniques or aesthetics the artistic team may bring to the project.

If you anticipate that “tap dance,” for example, will be a significant component of the project, you may want to note that here. This helps MAP staff better pair your application with reviewers who have the appropriate expertise(s).

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8. Please fill out and upload the Artistic Team spreadsheet available HERE.

Please include information about the artists on the artistic team. There are up to 25 spots available, but we encourage you to use fewer, if possible. While MAP is not interested in limiting the scope of your team, understand that it is difficult for reviewers to grasp “who is making what contribution to the work” when you submit a large number of people.  

For those that work as a collective or ensemble, you are welcome to name the entity on one line, rather than listing each individual member. This means you would provide a collective bio on behalf of the group, etc.

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9. Artist statement format options

  • Written response (up to 500 words)
  • Video response (up to 3 minutes)

Please select one option. The statement may be from the voice of one or more artists.

MAP is offering written and video formats, so that artists can speak through the form they are most comfortable articulating their ideas. If you choose video format, remember that we are looking for one or more artists to simply speak into the camera about their ideas. Please do not submit a “work sample” here.

There is no expectation for “high production values.” You are welcome to film one or more artists speaking into an iPhone or other recording device from your apartment, etc. However, you will want to make sure that the image and audio clearly communicate your ideas.

MAP staff invites you to speak to any of the following within the artist statement:

  • Passion for the project
  • Passion for the themes / content / social issues in the project
  • Entrance and exit strategies for those working in and with communities
  • Care with regard to power structures amongst collaborators as relevant
  • Other details about processes and practices informing the work that you didn’t have space for in the project description
  • Your sense of urgency or relevance (why are you excited to work on this project at this particular moment)
  • Anything else you wish to communicate to the reviewers and panelists

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10. Work samples

You must include a total of 2 work samples. These options are available:

  • 1 work-in-progress of the proposed project + 1 sample of a past work created within the last five years
  • 2 samples of past work created within the last five years

Good reasons to include a work-in-progress sample:

  • You have footage that communicates information about what the live experience will be like.
  • You have footage that includes some degree of production values, meaning the reviewers and panelists can get a strong sense of what the performance will look and feel like.
  • You have a “close to final” draft of the script, including text that treats the larger themes you mentioned in the project description of the application.
  • You have a “close to final” draft of a sound score that gives reviewers and panelists a strong sense of the musical landscape of the project.

Among the two samples, we strongly recommend that at least one of the samples represents live performance work in audio or video format.

The samples must include content generated by at least one of the artists listed among the artistic team.

For audio / video samples:

  • Each sample should be no longer than 5 minutes in length and no shorter than 2 minutes. You are welcome to submit full-length samples, but please provide specific cue points for reviewers. If you do not indicate a cue point, they will watch or listen to the first 2 minutes of the material.

For written samples:

  • Please upload a script, text or libretto sample and select ten pages you would like the reviewers to read. If you do not indicate a specific section, the reviewers will read the first ten pages of the material. We do not recommend submitting more than one written sample.

All sample types must include:

  • Work sample title
  • Name(s) of artist(s) whose content is present in the sample
  • Short description (150 words)
  • Speak specifically to the elements that help the reviewer connect the sample to your proposed project
  • Cue Points or page selections as needed if you choose to upload full-length samples
  • An uploaded file of the work sample or a URL link to the work sample with passwords as needed
  • Accepted file types include: pdf, docx, doc, mp3, m4a, wav, mp4, mov

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